Saturday, October 28, 2006

Lutheran Rosary - How To and Supplies

Hello Children of God,

Besides this last week being my birthday, I have also been very involved in some legal matters that have taken a lot of my time. Needless to say, these matters are far from over and will be going on for the near future. To follow Luther's Eighth Commandment, God is using this situation to help me understand how I need to grow as a Child of God!!!!

On to my short excurses today....I have always had an interest in the Catholic Rosary and in teaching World Religions, I have had the opportunity to have students who are Catholic speak about their faith and the use of the Rosary in Prayer.

One way I would like to help Lutheranism is to help further develop the use of Prayer Beads for Contemplative Prayer. Thus, I have been doing some searching on-line for some resources. The below list is only composed of on-line resources that I found and believe would be of benefit for those who are interested in learning more about the Rosary. Let me make my disclaimer here by saying, I only offer these as resources and only believe that through the death and resurrection of Jesus Christ do we receive any benefit. Further more I do not believe in praying to the Saints. My intention is only to offer resources for Christians, specifically Lutherans to enrich their faith by directed prayer.

On to the resources I found. Here are the web links for the sites:

http://www.rukoushelmet.net/English.htm

http://www.centralmpls.org/serve/prayer/beads.php

http://aelflaed.homemail.com.au/doco/rosaries2.html

Broad Rosary Site

http://www.rosaryworkshop.com/


Ranger Rosary Site – How to make a Rosary

http://www.rangerrosary.com/make.html

Prayer Cord/Rope

http://www.rosaryworkshop.com/SERVICEcordRosaries.html


Keepsake Rosaries

http://www.keepsakerosaries.com/Links.htm



Confessional Lutheran Reaction to the Rosary

http://orthodoxlutheran.fws1.com/bvm/rosary.html

Lutheran Prayer Beads – ELCA Affiliated Site

http://www.lutheranprayerbeads.com/




As well, here are some sites that you can get some of the accessories needed to make prayer beads. These are compiled from an e-mail I received from Kelly Klages (Thank you Kelly!!!) Please go and look at her web blog and site. She is a real artist who is very talented and married to a Lutheran Pastor in the LCMS Sister Synod, Lutheran Church Canada!!!

~General beading supplies:

Fire Mountain Gems – http://www.firemountaingems.com

~Freshwater pearls, clasps, other gemstone strands –http://www.treasureislandpearls.com/sunshop/

~Crucifixes/crosses

American Source –http://www.rosaryparts.com/index.asp

Canadian source – http://www.avemariascircle.com/Contact_Us_USD.htm


Pendants (including crosses) – http://www.silver-insanity.com/category_s/11.htm


~Other charms – http://www.beadstudio.com/catalog.php

Please e-mail me if you have questions. I would love to hear from you!!!!


YIC,
Darian L. Hybl

9 comments:

oratiomom said...

I like the idea...not sure about the alternate prayers on the ELCA site though. Any other info?

We have a lot of rosaries hangin' round from RC days...

Thanks

Stoleman said...

Hello Oratiomom,

I am working on a post to deal with your query, but am having problems with my computer and my wife's birthday is next week. I am currently using a computer at a local school to respond. Please hang with me!!!

YIC,
Darian L. Hybl

Anonymous said...

Excellent post. I have done a Lutheran rosary for Lent for two years now. I took it up as a way to fulfill my challenge to myself to "add something" rather than "give something up" for Lent. (I wanted to add at least a 1/2 hour of prayer)

I have come across many resources, including the ones you have here - but your post is a nice, concise place for people to start.

Well done indeed!

Jay
jWinters.com
...and if you wanna talk Lutheran saints - head to my page.

Anonymous said...

Hi... new here... I'm a Lutheran that regularly prays with a rosary... in fact, I make them myself.

Just stoppin' by!

Bill

Anonymous said...

Hello. I have made my own. It has a total of 17 beads and two center pieces.

I use the right side for morning prayer.
The left side for close of day prayer.
I use the outline from the book "A Daily Prayer Catechism - The Lord Will Answer".

I start at the CROSS with the "Trinitarian Invocation"

then first 3 beads for the "Introit" - A Psalm or hymn.

The FIRST center piece for the Glory Be.

The 7 beads to the right:
1) A Scripture reading
2) Lord's Prayer
3) Prayer for others
4) Prayer for myself
5) Apostle's Creed
6) Concluding Collect
7) Luther's Morning Prayer

2nd center piece I say a final Amen.

Close of the day:

I start at the CROSS with the "Trinitarian Invocation"

then first 3 beads for the "Introit" A Psalm or hymn.

The FIRST center piece for the Glory Be.

The 7 beads to the left:
1) A Scripture reading
2) Canticle
3) Lord's Prayer
4) Prayer for others
5) Prayer for myself
6) Nicene Creed
7) Luther's Evening Prayer

2nd center piece I say a final Amen.

If used to focus on Christ... I find this a nice "visual tool" to assist in daily prayer.

Hope that this gives another appropriate idea.

In Christ

Amy said...

http://www.flickr.com/photos/mausheimer/3337149606/in/set-72157614944548314/
View large to see the details and alphabet letter beads. This was a gift to a Lutheran pastor who moved away. I was a Lutheran when I was a kid.

Here's one I designed to thank the Salvation Army officer who helped me: http://www.flickr.com/photos/mausheimer/3731494322/in/set-72157614944548314/
Run mouse over the photo to see the Notes about the features.

Anonymous said...

Look at Psalms 136, which is a litany(a prayer with a recurring refrain) meant to be sung in the Jewish Temple.In the psalm the refrain is "His mercy endures forever." Sometimes in Psalms 136 the refrain starts before a sentence is finished, meaning it is more repititious than the rosary, though this prayer was directly written under the inspiration of God.

It is meditation on the holy mysteries that gives the rosary its staying power.The Joyful Mysteries are these: the Annunciation(St.Luke 1:26-38),
the Visitation(St.Luke 1:40-56),the Nativity(St. Luke 2:6-20), the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple(St.Luke 2:21-39), and the Finding of the child Jesus in the Temple(St.Luke 2:41-51).

Then come the Sorrowful Mysteries: the Agony in the Garden(St. Matthew 26:36-46), the Scourging(St.Matthew 27:26),the Crowning with Thorns(St.Matthew 27:29), the Carrying of the Cross(St.John 19:17), and the Crucifixion(St. Luke 23:33-46).

The final Mysteries are the Glorious: the Resurrection(St.Luke
24:1-12),the Ascension(St.Luke
24:50-51),the Descent of the Holy Spirit(Acts 2:1-4), the Assumption of Mary into heaven(Revelatyion 12),and her Coronation(cf.Revelation 12:1).

Given the scriptual basis of the mysteries,its little wonder that many Protestants,once they understand the meditations that are the essence of the rosary,happily take it up as a devotion.

Both Catholics and non-Catholics(Anglicans,Episcopalians,Lutherans,Methodists,Presbyterians,etc...),as they learn more about the rosary and make more frequent use of it,come to see how its meditations bring to mind the sweet fragrance of not only the Mother of God,but of Jesus Christ himself.

Anonymous said...

Look at Psalms 136, which is a litany(a prayer with a recurring refrain) meant to be sung in the Jewish Temple.In the psalm the refrain is "His mercy endures forever." Sometimes in Psalms 136 the refrain starts before a sentence is finished, meaning it is more repititious than the rosary, though this prayer was directly written under the inspiration of God.

It is meditation on the holy mysteries that gives the rosary its staying power.The Joyful Mysteries are these: the Annunciation(St.Luke 1:26-38),
the Visitation(St.Luke 1:40-56),the Nativity(St. Luke 2:6-20), the Presentation of Jesus in the Temple(St.Luke 2:21-39), and the Finding of the child Jesus in the Temple(St.Luke 2:41-51).

Then come the Sorrowful Mysteries: the Agony in the Garden(St. Matthew 26:36-46), the Scourging(St.Matthew 27:26),the Crowning with Thorns(St.Matthew 27:29), the Carrying of the Cross(St.John 19:17), and the Crucifixion(St. Luke 23:33-46).

The final Mysteries are the Glorious: the Resurrection(St.Luke
24:1-12),the Ascension(St.Luke
24:50-51),the Descent of the Holy Spirit(Acts 2:1-4), the Assumption of Mary into heaven(Revelatyion 12),and her Coronation(cf.Revelation 12:1).

Given the scriptual basis of the mysteries,its little wonder that many Protestants,once they understand the meditations that are the essence of the rosary,happily take it up as a devotion.

Both Catholics and non-Catholics(Anglicans,Episcopalians,Lutherans,Methodists,Presbyterians,etc...),as they learn more about the rosary and make more frequent use of it,come to see how its meditations bring to mind the sweet fragrance of not only the Mother of God,but of Jesus Christ himself.

Kirsten said...

Hello, we have been making Lutheran rosaries for several years now. For those who have Roman rosaries and would like them converted to the Lutheran style we can do that for you!
Peace
www.wsbeads.com